inmgq

Programmname:
Inter-Network Mail Guide Query Utility
Kurzbeschreibung:
Hilfestellung beim Verschicken von Mails zwischen verschiedenen Netzwerken
Version:
1.7
Voraussetzungen:
-
Aufruf:
interaktiv: 'inmgq'
command line: 'inmgq INMGQ-BEFEHL'
Information:
'inmgq help'
Beispiele, Bibliothek:
-
Demo, Tutorial:
-
Lokation:
/usr/local/bin/inmgq; /usr/local/lib/inmg
Ansprechpartner:
Vera Heinau [heinau]
Bemerkungen:
-
Installationshinweise
Zusatzinformationen:
s.u.

# INTRODUCTION
#
# This file documents methods of sending mail from one network to another.
#
[...]
# HOW TO USE THIS GUIDE
#
# This document is meant to be both human-readable and machine-parseable.  I
# have an experimental Perl script that performs queries on this document -
# send me e-mail if you would like a copy.
#
# If you just want to browse the guide manually for information, this is what
# you need to know.  The guide is organized as a list of entries.  Each entry
# tells you how to get from one network to another.  Here is what a typical
# entry might look like:
#
#   #F mynet
#   #T yournet
#   #R youraddress
#   #C contactaddress
#   #I send to 'youraddress@thegateway'
#
# This means that to send mail _f_rom a network called 'mynet' _t_o a
# _r_ecipient address 'youraddress' on a network called 'yournet', you
# should follow the _i_nstructions shown and address your mail to
# 'youraddress@thegateway'.  (The quotes are not part of the address
# you should use, and if you see \' between the double quotes, you
# should type just ' when addressing your mail.)  If you have trouble
# sending mail, you can try sending mail to 'contactaddress' for help.
#
# Network names are listed together with a brief description of each network,
# before the main entires.  The main entries themselves are sorted
# alphabetically, first by source network and then by destination network.
# Network connections that can be generated transitively (A->B and B->C give
# A->B->C) are generally omitted.  If you need further information on the
# format, read the following section.
#
# HOW TO PARSE THIS GUIDE
#
# The format of this guide is designed to be a reasonable compromise between
# the automatically parsable and the humanly legible.
# 
# As distributed, the guide consists of a sequence of lines of up to eighty
# octets in the range [32,126] representing characters in the ASCII encoding,
# with each line terminated by a newline (decimal 10) character.
#
# Valid lines are either empty or begin with a '#'.  Invalid lines should
# be rejected as being part of an encapsulation such as a mail header.
# 
# The portion of a non-empty, valid line following the '#' consists of a tag
# and data.  The tag is the longest leading string of characters that does not
# contain a space, the data is the portion of the line after the first space
# if any.  Leading spaces in the data are ignored, except on continuation lines
# (see below).
# 
# Lines tagged with a '-' are continuation lines.  If more than eighty
# characters need to be placed in one logical record, the characters should
# be placed in several lines, with all lines after the first tagged with a '-'.
# A (possibly singleton) set of lines will be referred to as a record.  A
# record's tag is the tag of its first line.
#
# Records with empty tags (such as these) are comments for human eyes only
# and should in general be silently ignored by an automatic parser.
#
# Records are grouped into blocks, delimited by empty lines.  Empty blocks,
# or blocks which contain nothing but comments, should be ignored.
# 
# The first block of the file consists of 'V'-tagged records which give
# version information for the file.  The format of this information is
# subject to change, and should not be automatically parsed.  In this
# edition, the first block is at the very beginning of the file.
#
# The second block of the file consists of 'N'-tagged records which declare
# identifiers to be used in referring to networks in the rest of the file.
# Each such record is divided into ';'-separated fields.  The fields are
# currently: identifier, full name, organization, category (academic, bbs,
# commercial, in-house, non-profit, none or ?).  Leading and trailing spaces
# in fields should be ignored.  In fact, without further ado, here's the
# second block.
____________________

Vera Heinau, Burkhard Kirste, 1993/06/10